Why hasn’t the old contraceptive technology been replaced?

There are many ways of contraception in the long run; The history of these methods shows the importance of declining technology, fading technology, and the return of “old” technology. Contraception is a wonderful example. When it comes to contraception, the first thing that comes to mind is the pill. The reason why birth control pills are important is not just because it is a powerful method of contraception, but also because it is often thought to bring about sexual revolution. In rich countries is the real sexual revolution, so it can claim the use of synthetic steroid hormone has brought the sexual revolution, it is a small and ordinary technology how to trigger a striking example of a huge change. What the pill actually causes, however, is unclear. Linking the birth control pill directly to the sexual revolution can be easily seen by the assumption that there is no substitute for contraceptives or other methods. In contrast, the history of these other methods is almost unknown. The pill is the subject of much literature, but condoms and many other common birth control technologies are rarely the focus of contraception history. However, there are many ways of contraception in the long run; The history of these methods shows the importance of declining technology, fading technology, and the return of “old” technology. Contraception is a wonderful example. People have long used different methods to control fertility and contraception. There were several birth control techniques in the 20th century, including abortion, ligation, extracorporeal ejaculation, contraceptives made from rubber, and chemical contraception. During most of the 20th century, some contraception is illegal in many places in the world, and almost all hidden in the public eye, it’s hard to know the actual situation, or in the use of these methods.

After the sexual revolution, many contraceptive methods that appeared earlier than the pill did not disappear. After the birth control pill, there was more research on contraceptive methods than before, bringing with it the technology to compete with contraceptives, including the uterine contraceptive device (IUD). Condoms are one of those technologies that grow, disappear, and reappear. After the AIDS epidemic, sales soared in the 1980s, a phenomenon that allowed condoms to be publicly mentioned as well as contraceptives for the first time. The production capacity of the global insurance cover increased from 4.9 billion per year in 1981 to 12 billion in the mid-1990s. What is expected is that the condoms also have technological innovations. The first condom to fit the anatomy of the human body was produced in 1969, and in 1974 there was a condom used to lubricate the condom, and more innovation followed. Durex, the insurance brand, celebrated its 75th anniversary in 2004 with the slogan “75 years of great sex.”