HOT EGG 01

Feng Tao
Interviewed by Yalin Cao

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Wang Jian guo
Interviewed by Tong Hua

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Kosta Kakarounta
Interviewed by Charikelia Papapostolou

Would you like to tell about yourself?

My name is Konstantinos Kakarountas. I am a Greek director and film producer. I am also the founder of Dahouse Studio Productions here in Athens. The studio specializes in film production, TV commercials, Virtual Reality and Video Installations. I studied in France. I am a Fine Arts graduate, from Poitiers, with a DNA and DNSEP.

What were your first influences?

From a very young age I was fascinated by comics. I was interested not only in the stories I read, but also in the different techniques and styles employed in the Ninth Art. Subsequently, I entered the world of painting. My first artistic search in the world of visual arts and especially in painting, was surrealism. Artists such as Francis Bacon, Salvador Dali, Marcel Duchamp, Rene Magritte, H.R. Giger influenced me greatly. Later, for an inexplicable reason, I was affected by Italian Futurism. I was enchanted by the creations of Carlo Carrà and Giacomo Balla. The latter led me to new artistic quests.

What are your artistic concerns or pursuits?

Through futurism I moved into the field of animation, since the depiction of the moving figure interested me more. I became a technology enthusiast, which, towards the end of 90’s was at its peak. So, I moved from traditional Animation to 3D Animation, mostly in cinema. I combined visual effects and 3D Animation to narrate. Being a fan of George Lucas, Terry Gilliam, Ridley Scott, Guillermo del Toro, Quentin Tarantino and Guy Ritchie, I started with experimental short films and Video Installations. I drew my stories from simple human stories and literary texts. I gradually became an observer in society and started to listen for its problems. Through the art of Cinema and Animation, I try to convey messages and concerns, sometimes by sugarcoating them, and others in a way that might shock the viewer. My goal is to make the viewer think and not merely be entertained. I am also interested in the subject of the author, especially the digital actor, since this was the subject of my postgraduate dissertation.

What are you preparing now? Would you like to share your future plans with us?

At the moment, I am preparing two productions. I am preparing two short films. Both films are related to the financial crisis since as you know, it has affected many people here in Greece, let alone the artistic world.

The first movie is called “Christmas Present”, which I am signing with the award-winning script writer Petros Koskinas.  It is a 3D Animated movie, which deals with the impact of financial crisis on people’s lives and the extent to which it can affect their decisions. It is a monologue which poses questions and dilemmas regardning people’s lives at critical moments. From a visual perspective, my interest lies in the narrative as well as the interaction between the actor and the digital actor through Animation.

I am also working on my second short film, entitled “15:16”. The filming was completed in June 2019. Due to the oddity of the script, I was influenced by the Ancient Greek Theater. Ancient Greeks emphasized the used of masks to dramatize the work even more. So, since my story talks about the “miracle” and the way I perceive it, I used elements of Ancient Greek Drama. I decided to replace the actors’ heads with stylized 3D heads to denote the grotesque figures which we all become during difficult human moments. Through this method of expression for the viewer, the movie adopts an articulate narrative pace.  It is a visually unique technique, and I am composing a different parallel world. My partners and I are trying to complete the movies within 2021.

In my future plans, there are other scripts which I want to direct, but for the time being I am making do with these two productions while running Dahouse Studio at the same time. Artistically, there is always the reason for alertness since the spirit should never quiet down, but seek new methods of expression and try in this way to “speak” with the viewer. After all, what stays in the end, is the dialogue between the artist and the viewer.

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Alberto Maggini
Interviewed by Charikleia Papapostolou
@albertomaggini33

Alberto’s work has a very strong and direct imprint.
An imposing and at the same time ironic rendering of the image with many contradictory interpretations that definitely make the image open to many readings.

At first glance we notice symbols reminiscent of the reproductive system as well as the fetal posture of the body, objects that look like human flesh and bones. What do these symbolisms mean for you?

My practice is mainly focused on three topics Metamorphosis, Identity and Motherhood. This arguments are interconnected for me. I come from a scientific background ( I studied Biology with an MA in Botany) so my artistic vocabulary deeps its roots in different worlds of interest. The reproductive system and others symbols that I use in my practice are a way to speak about Nature and how deep we are connected with Her. Really often I use a feminine symbolism because I think that the motherly way of act will be the future for us as a human been and for our Planet.

A very strong element is also the references to anthropomorphic monsters of mythology, as we could say. For example, Cerberus, the Third, the Typhoon.
Shall we consider it as a random and unconscious depiction or they might  symbolize creatures with their own reality, their own destiny, their own claim for life ?

The anthropomorphic monsters belongs to the past. I would refer talking about them like some “metamorphosis’s exercises”. In general, I am interested in the tension field between different poles or condition, the viscous in-between moment, the transience. With abstraction and figuration, I am searching for the moment when out of inanimate material something starts to appear or disappear back into. Like a sort of birth if you want.

In many photos you present yourself as a medium, do you consider this as an existential dialogue or is something like a more internal search for the subject that is being negotiated?

Sometimes I feel like I can only speak on my life, my experiences. I feel like most of the questions I pose or the roles I assume are roles that I am grappling within life. That’s why they are so important to manifest, and in manifesting them, it helps me move on. In the end life is all about changing and transformations

I can see a lot of everyday usual materials at your works. Do you think that they depict the ephemeral of life ?

In my practice I have never thought about ephemeral of life, conversely I think about my practice as a way to extend my life. I am producing something that will last longer than me. As there are so many different elements in my artistic practice, I like to create an environment, a habitat to bring those pieces together and to enable them to communicate with each other and the audience.

Would you like to share some of your future plans?

I will try to make some installation that could merge together my clay sculptures and my painting, so create a landscape for them.

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Anna Redwood
Interviewed by Alberto Maggini

Could you tell us something about War Arts Program and how you decided to be involved in this project ?

Having done a number of pieces for the army over the years, I was invited by the British army to go out at the War Artist for 7 th Armoured Brigade, The Desert Rats. 

Could you tell us something more about your practice, what inspired you?

I weave together historical significance, intimate details of other people’s lives and my own experiences in order to engage with challenging contemporary issues that make us experience the full range of human emotion. I want to root my work in its time and place, empowering others to tell their own stories while reflecting on the connection between their reality and my own.

I have seen that in some picture, while you were making portraits, you were surrounded from soldiers with weapons in their hands, did it makes you feel nervous? Did it affect your productions in some way? 

It was very strange spending a month in a war zone, like landing on another planet. It was shocking to start with that weapons were everywhere, even the bathrooms had pistols lined up by the sinks and rifles propped up by the showers, soldiers can never be more than three seconds away from their weapon. In the end it made me feel safer, going out on foot patrols armed with a sketchbook caused much amusement amongst the soldiers, “ What are you going to do, draw them to death”!

I felt the monolithic nature of the army often lets the individual be forgotten. I ended up making lots of pieces using collaboration with the soldiers, one example below

The Weight of Duty, a signpost weighing scales their exact distance to home. This refers to the care of duty for the individual by the government which I feel is often lacking.

In Afghanistan you made  a giant rat sculpture, using metal scrapped armoured, how this sculpture capture the essence of the military  campaign?

In terms of the development of my artistic practice, it certainly was a seminal moment for me receiving a commission from 7th Armoured Brigade (the Desert Rats) in Afghanistan. Moving from creating more individual works, a month spent living amongst soldiers gave me a unique perspective on the role that my art could play in telling their stories. I wanted to root the work in its time and place, relocating physical matter and transporting voices emanating from the Desert. To do this, I directly involved the soldiers in the creation of the art, empowering them to tell their own stories.

The Desert Rat, the emblem under which they fight, gave the soldiers a huge sense of belonging. Together we created a sculpture made from the remains of blown up vehicles. I think it created a certain essence of the campaign being an artwork built in a war zone, absolutely rooted in its time and place.

Do you already have some ideas on how you want push your practice further during this MAFA year?   

I am also excited to better engage with the theoretical history behind my instinctive creative processes, for which collaboration and information within an intimate environment clearly engaging with complex concepts; I am excited! Subject I wish to peruse are the extinction crisis and how we engage with it now, motherhood and menopause.

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Yalin Cao
Interviewed by BinBin Li

I began to contact painting as a child, but I didn’t have a deep artistic concept at that time, until my adolescence, my undergraduate education was graphic design, but I found that it was not particularly suitable for me, and even made me lost.

After my undergraduate graduation, I began to make contemporary art when I was studying in the preparatory course of ual, with the help of my tutors, I found myself in doing art and began to have my own artistic consciousness. Until I came to Chelsea in 2018, I was more convinced of my artistic thinking.

What is the inspiration for your work? 

My works are based on my understanding of Taoist culture and my own experience. In the process of doing art, I reflect and feel my life with my research on Taoist culture, I find that life and experience cannot be separated from Taoist culture. In the process of doing art, I constantly reflections and feelings, which makes me constantly have new insights, just like a circle.

What do you think of the new style of art?

In this pluralistic society and artistic environment, art needs to develop, which is an inevitable trend. The view of artistic style is very personal, but we must be sure that we will allow them to exist whether we like it or not.

What’s your opinion on the phenomenon that online celebrities punch in but don’t watch the works carefully?

I don’t have any opinions. There are social diversity. Some people will come to the exhibition seriously and others will not pay attention to it. No matter what intention they bring to the exhibition, they will pay for the tickets, which is the support for the art industry. Therefore, I would like to express my thanks.

In fact, the source of inspiration for each work is a combination of some life elements and emotional factors. These factors will give some vitality to art works.

What do you think is the vitality of your works?

I think my works are more about my own starting point. I hope that the audience can see “me” in my works of art. The emotion I give me is the vitality of my works, even another form of “I”

Plans to work in the art industry and ideas for the future?

always changes or not yet?

Do you think curatorial exhibition can solve some social problems or is it just a kind of self regulating self entertainment?

Art in most of the time is a kind of self entertainment behavior, as long as you look at the tendency of art, solving social problems is good, if you can sort out personal feelings is also great.

What impressed you most during the outbreak?

What makes me feel the most profound thing is that I saw an article from netizens in my hometown. In fact, the Covid-19 has passed in most areas of China, but for the emergency blockade in Xinjiang, most people were unprepared. “The Covid-19 did not defeat China, it defeated me,” he wrote.

What do you think is the most important thing for a young artist?

always to be yourself!

What is an art gallery or an exhibition like for you (and for society)? What does it mean?

For me, art gallery is a place to communicate with the audience. At the same time, it is also a place for artists to place their souls. Artists use their works of art to connect with the audience.

For the society, the most important role of art gallery is to carry the civilization and spiritual world of the society. It shows the public some social repercussions or civilization trends most intuitively.

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Binbin Li
Interviewed by Yalin Cao

Can you introduce your artistic background? (history of art growth, for example, when did you start to contact art, study, etc.)

I started to contact art from a very young age. At first I was painting. Maybe I was four or five years old. Because my great grandfather was a local artist, all the children in my family would learn art. It may have become a family tradition. At the same time, I also studied music and dance. When I was admitted to the undergraduate school, I finally chose art as my major, in Shanghai After finishing my bachelor’s degree, then I came to ual.

What’s your feeling about the process of making art works for you? What is your inspiration? (hidden question, can your art creation and life be separated?

I don’t think the process of creation should be in accordance with the rules. To me, the creation of art works should be an emotional vent, and also my personal research on society. Usually, my inspiration is from society and personal emotion. At the same time, I think that personal feelings also reflect the society.

Hidden problem: Art and life must be inseparable. At least I think that good art must (personal opinion, maybe not for some people) come from life. First, we must live well, then art.

Do you think new media art is in the leading position in modern art?

Of course, in fact, I think it is an irresistible trend for the media to bring forth the new. For example, the Internet and mobile communication will become old media sooner or later, if they are self-contained and do not want to change and forge ahead. Newer media will catch up. Then it is the word “new”. New things should be in the leading position. Of course, the so-called “new media” will be overtaken or replaced by “new” media one day.

What do you think is the connection/relationship between your work and the audience? How does your work interact with the audience?

Most of my works are from the perspective of psychology and psychoanalysis. It is inevitable to connect with the audience. What you watch is what happens to you. What you see here is not a certain body action, but those emotional and psychological effects.

Has your work ever been controversial?

In fact, I think every work is controversial, because each audience’s perspective is different, everyone’s knowledge system and growth environment are different, and the feelings of watching works will be different, so it is inevitable to have disputes

If the audience’s interpretation has deviated from the original intention of the production, the meaning of the work should be based on the self or the audience.

This matter should be different from each artist’s idea. For me, I think before each work is made, I know very well whether the work will be used for exhibition, whether it is to be watched by the public, if it is only used for self venting, it doesn’t matter what other people’s understanding is, but as a piece of work that I want to show to the public It should have the ability to make the public understand.

Does Covid-19 affect the way you work?

Yes, before the outbreak of the virus, most of my work methods were still offline devices or some offline shooting performance art, but the outbreak of the virus made me realise that I had neglected many arts before.

What impact do you think the Covid-19 has on the art market and how much does it affect you? In fact, I think the new crown epidemic is a good catalyst for the art industry, which has stimulated many possibilities, made people realize the fear of the unknown, and accelerated the progress of the whole society several times.

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Jiali Mai
Interviewed by Binbin Li

BINBIN:Can you introduce your artistic background? (history of art growth, for example, when did you start to contact art, study, etc.)

Jenny:I completed my BA photography course at Kingston University in 2019, and then took a one-year GD FINE ART course in Chelsea. I am currently studying MA fine art in Chelsea.

BINBIN:What’s your feeling about the process of making art works for you? What is your inspiration? (hidden question, can your art creation and life be separated? If you don’t want to answer, ignore this hidden question.)

Jenny:For me, the origin of my creation usually occurs in an instant. For example, I may spend a long time thinking about what kind of work I would like  to create, but I cannot start my exploration smoothly and always waste my time to have nothing. I’m the kind of person who needs pressure to push and stimulate my creative inspiration, although I know this is incorrect.  However, I personally think that most of my high-quality works are often produced under pressure. Most of my works are closely related to my life. When I once wanted to create some works that were completely out of my life, I found that I couldn’t start at all, because my source of inspiration came from my experience.

BINBIN: Do you think new media art is in the leading position in modern art?

Jenny:Although I am a new media artist and most of my works are digital or performance.  However, I personally think that new media art is only a part of contemporary art.  Although audiences can come into contact with new media art in different ways. But in most of the exhibition or art market, I think the  paintings or sculptures are the most visible and

BINBIN :What do you think is the connection/relationship between your work and the audience? How does your work interact with the audience?

Jenny:I am currently interested in performance art. I have no restrictions on the venue for my work. I can perform my performance art in any place at any time (if legal).

BINBIN: Has your work ever been controversial?

Jenny:I am still exploring my inspiration and creation. My work itself has not caused controversy, but the process of creating my work will get a lot of incomprehension, because many viewers don’t understand what performance art is. When I performing  it in the public  and many audiences would  think it might looks interesting or creepy that the way I perform.

BINBIN:If the audience’s interpretation has deviated from the original intention of the production, the meaning of the work should be based on the self or the audience?

Jenny:Every audience has a different understanding of art. No one can force others to fully understand the story behind this artwork. I think it is good for me to have my own creative concept, but the audience’s different understanding can also inspire me.

BINBIN:Do you think your works have high requirements for the exhibition? (I hope you can explain the relationship between your work and the exhibition venue to answer this question.)

Jenny:I am currently interested in performance art. I have no restrictions on the venue for my work and I can perform my performance art in any area at any time (if legal).

BINBIN:How do you deal with your relationship with the market before galleries and agents step in? (or answer whether your work is ready to enter the market or has entered the market)

Jenny:I personally think that my work itself has no commercial value, I am just doing what I like.  Art and the market are closely integrated, so if I have the opportunity to be promoted and recognised by the art market, I think this will be a brand new experience.

BINBIN Does the Covid-19 affect the way you work?

Jenny:Not really, , because I will do my creations indoors most of the time.

BINBIN :What impact do you think the Covid-19 has on the art market and how much does it affect you?

Jenny: I personally think that the art market has not had a particularly negative impact, because the art market is very unstable. Regardless of whether there is an epidemic or not, the art market has its own regulations and procedures.

The epidemic has not had too much impact on me. The only inconvenience is that I cannot perform my performance art in public area, but I can record my performances indoors or in studios.

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Vickie Amiralis
Interviewed by Jiali Mai

@vickieamiralis  www.vickieamiralis.com

Could you tell me something about your background, such as your career and what you are interested in?

I completed a BA Media Arts course in 2011. In my final year I started a gallery in a theatre cafe and curated exhibitions there. When I graduated I was head-hunted by The Vinyl Factory to open up their first public gallery space in South Kensington, London. After 3 years of exhibitions we moved across town and started doing pop-up exhibitions in carparks and other locations. Throughout this time I started working on the record label and to this day I still work with artists and musicians to create limited edition vinyl and events.My interests: environment, people, music, illustration, poetry and spider plants.

When and how you find out your own ways to explore your artworks or your creations and how that relates to your experience?

Everything’s an experimentation of an idea I’ve had. Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn’t. I flitter between multiple mediums which I guess helps give me some freedom with those ideas.

As an artist, how do you respond to criticism of your work (e.g., criticism from art critics, audience feedback)?

There’s always going to be someone who’ll love an idea, hate it or think they can do it better so I like to take criticism with a pinch of salt and pat myself on the back for actually finishing a piece of work and having someone who actually wants to spend time critiquing it.

Would you review your previous artworks and consider most of your works to be in a state of completion, and if not, would you plan to delve further into it again?

The artworks I’ve shown may be complete but the same themes will continue to show through future works. My sculpture pieces are created from salvaged materials and I always wonder whether I can recycle those materials into something new.

Do you feel that your creation has your own personal style?

My illustrations are pretty bright and playful whereas my sculpture works are somewhat industrial with earthly aesthetics so my style is pretty split down the middle.

Have you been affected by the epidemic that has prevented you from working on your artworks?

The change in environment has seen me shift from welding and large sculpture works to more illustrations and digital projects.

Do you think the epidemic has affected the development of the art market to some extent?

Banksy’s ‘Show Me the Monet’ sold at auction last week for £7.5m. It’s definitely not dead but it certainly is changing.

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Gin-Young Song Interviewed by Jiali Mai

@ songginyoung  @songdoll_rocky 

Could you tell me something about your background, such as your career and what you are interested in?

I have bachelor’s and master’s degrees at the University of Seoul.
I had 9 solo exhibitions and a number of group exhibitions. 
I’m almost doing installation art but sometimes making sculptures and paintings. 

A few months ago, I traveled to England on a trip and fell in love with London and had two exhibitions. Then, I decided living in London and recently approved by the Art Council of Global Talent Visa. I’m going to stay in London soon. 

When and how you find out your own ways to explore your artworks or your creations and how that relates to your experience?

I am less planned and spontaneous. I tend to keep the possibilities open and not to miss new opportunities in life.  I am a visual artist, but I open many senses and get inspirations from various senses.

There is not a specific time to discover what is mine.  Art always coexists in my life. And artwork is not all of my life, but a part that I can express. Every moment in my life becomes inspirations. Ultimately, how I live my life is more important. My work contains my life and I want to give many people the courage to live their own life through it.

As an artist, how do you respond to criticism of your work (e.g., criticism from art critics, audience feedback)?


I don’t think not everyone likes my work.  Also, I don’t think everyone thinks the way I think.
However, I don’t ignore those thoughts just because I have different thoughts.  Art eventually creates and needs interaction.

Would you review your previous artworks and consider most of your works to be in a state of completion, and if not, would you plan to delve further into it again?

Obviously, after opening the exhibition, I keep seeing what is lacking.  But nothing is perfect in this world.  The appearance that seems lacking has its meaning in its history.
And that advances the next exhibition.

Do you feel that your creation has your own personal style?

I think my artworks is obviously me. As I said earlier, that’s why my life is important. It is all projected into the work and I want to be honest and be pure in my life and in my artworks.

Have you been affected by the epidemic that has prevented you from working on your artworks?

Many exhibitions were canceled due to social distancing.  And, it took me more time than expected to get back to England. But through this, it became an opportunity to learn the whole world, not myself.

Do you think the epidemic has affected the development of the art market to some extent?

Obviously, the art market has stagnated. But we may have had a meaningful time as one. 

A new paradigm is emerging due to social distancing.  Not only art but also performing arts are making new attempts, such as performing concerts without audiences.  Many art works are being created as a common theme for people around the world called Corona.

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Binbin Li Interviewed by Jiali Mai

@fionnnnalixr 

https://330862645.wixsite.com/my-site/project

Could you tell me something about your background, such as your career and what you are interested in?

I began to contact painting as a child, but I didn’t have a deep artistic concept at that time, until my adolescence, my undergraduate education was graphic design, but I found that it was not particularly suitable for me, and even made me lost.

After my undergraduate graduation, I began to make contemporary art when I was studying in the preparatory course of ual, with the help of my tutors, I found myself in doing art and began to have my own artistic consciousness. Until I came to Chelsea in 2018, I was more convinced of my artistic thinking.

When and how you find out your own ways to explore your artworks or your creations and how that relates to your experience?

My works are based on my understanding of Taoist culture and my own experience. In the process of doing art, I reflect and feel my life with my research on Taoist culture, I find that life and experience cannot be separated from Taoist culture. In the process of doing art, I constantly reflections and feelings, which makes me constantly have new insights, just like a circle.

As an artist, how do you respond to criticism of your work (e.g., criticism from art critics, audience feedback?)

I’m very impressed. Once an artist criticized me, an artist questioned that the materials I used might not conform to my concept. At present, I don’t think it is inconsistent. I insist on my own ideas, and the materials I choose have certain meanings.

Would you review your previous artworks and consider most of your works to be in a state of completion, and if not, would you plan to delve further into it again?

It is necessary to reflect and review my works, because my works express my thoughts, and it is very interesting to reflect on myself as a process of philosophy. Some of them have evolved from previous works, and they are connected, just as my life is evolving.

Do you feel that your creation has your own personal style?

I think my works have strong personal characteristics.

Have you been affected by the epidemic that has prevented you from working on your artworks?

The new coronavirus did not affect how I created art, it just made it impossible for me to participate in art exhibitions.

Do you think the epidemic has affected the development of the art market to some extent?

I think the biggest impact is that you can’t go to some offline exhibitions. At the same time, it also dampens the enthusiasm of many artists. The art market has led to a cold period,

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Lo Harley Interviewed by Jiali Mai

@lo_lee_taaa  

https://i-d.vice.com/fr/article/wxqjgz/la-photographe-lo-harley-capture-les-femmes-qui-linspirent

Could you tell me something about your background, such as your career and what you are interested in?

Hi, I’m Lo Harley, a photographer and writer from South London. Currently I’m working at a studio and for magazine, as well as shooting my own personal projects on the side. There are a lot of inspirations in my life – Lana Del Rey’s music, Bret Easton Ellis’s books, David Lynch’s films, Ed Ruscha’s paintings, Juergen Teller’s grunge photographs… I could go on! I love artists with a strong voice and a strong vision and work that is authentic and honest. Thematically, I think love is most important to me. Work with love as the central message is something I’m drawn to the most.

When and how you find out your own ways to explore your artworks or your creations and how that relates to your experience?

I think that everything I do relates back to significant experiences I’ve had in some way because that’s what I’ve lived and that’s what I know. Whatever I’m going through somehow finds it way into my work, even if it’s only clear to me or someone close to me. If I’m feeling particularly dark, my work tends to be darker… ‘Life imitates art, art imitates life’.

As an artist, how do you respond to criticism of your work (e.g., criticism from art critics, audience feedback)?

Criticism is something I don’t really think about and if I do, I’m usually my toughest critic. Obviously if I’m having a bad day and someone doesn’t like my work I can get sensitive about it and carry it with me for a long time but generally as long as I feel it’s a truthful to me and what I wanted to do then it doesn’t really get to me. Criticism is just opinion so with the good you have to take the bad, and if someone doesn’t get it that’s ok. I was talking to a friend once about a record they liked, that I didn’t, and they said, ‘the world is wrong and I am right!’ and I think about that a lot.

Would you review your previous artworks and consider most of your works to be in a state of completion, and if not, would you plan to delve further into it again?

Some of my work I look back on as complete but some I think what I could have done to take it further or how I would have shot something or worded something differently if I saw the world the way I do now, as opposed to then. I don’t really look back at my old work that often because I want to always be moving forward. But maybe I should reflect more in order to do that.

Do you feel that your creation has your own personal style?

Style is important. I think a lot of the great photographers and writers are instantly recognisable. You see their work and you’re like yes that’s a line by Truman Capote or yes that’s a Guy Bourdin image. You can see their eye and their way of seeing. As I shoot more and figure out what I like and don’t like I hope that I’m shaping my style and creating some sort of aesthetic for myself.

Have you been affected by the epidemic that has prevented you from working on your artworks?

The epidemic has really affected my work because I love to work with people! It’s been really tough this year to stay positive and produce pictures but I hope that slowly, soon things will get better. The main thing that’s kept me sane is writing, especially journalling. It’s become an essential part of my day.

Do you think the epidemic has affected the development of the art market to some extent?


I think art has had to change with what’s been going on, like so many other industries right now. It’s a weird time and artists have had to not only reflect what’s going on but evolve with a quickly changing world to stay alive. With the recent depressing government campaigns advising artist’s to ‘retrain’, it’s been hard to feel like there’s support for the arts. However, it has been really inspiring seeing so many online prints sales raising money for the Black Lives Matter movement and for COVID relief. Now more than ever we need art.

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